An Apology

Hello Everyone, We messed up. Earlier in the month, we released two collected volumes of fiction and poetry: our FIYAH Year One collection and our FIYAH Year Two collection. We were very excited to get these collected editions out to the public, and in our haste, we did not secure the rights to collect or republish those stories. By doing…

"REVIEW" in Black and gold

Open Call: Reviewers Wanted

Hey everyone! Over the last several months, FIYAH staff devoted a lot of intentional thought and discussion into featuring book reviews on our site. Today we’re excited to announce: IT. IS. TIME! The world deserves more Black thoughts on books, critique of problematic titles, well-earned stanning, and everything in between. But we can’t and don’t want to do it alone. Black…

A Letter from Justina

Dear FIYAH Readers, Goodbyes are difficult, but they’re also best done without much fanfare. So, beginning January 2019, I will no longer be editing FIYAH. Instead, I will be leaving the magazine to work on my own stuff, and to enjoy the abundant blessings of living in a time when certain spheres of publishing seem to be finally embracing Black…

FIYAH Donation Icon

Donate to FIYAH!

Got some extra scratch burning a hole in your… mobile banking device? Well, now you can donate it to FIYAH to help us exceed your expectations in 2017. Our staff is a volunteer staff, so your donations don’t go to our pockets. Instead, you’ll help: increase the amount we are able to pay our creative contributors of art and over 144,000-ish words of…

Call for Cover Art Submissions

THIS SUBMISSION WINDOW IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO EVERY WONDERFULLY TALENTED ARTIST WHO SENT US THEIR WORK. WE WILL BE ISSUING RESPONSES THE FIRST WEEK OF NOVEMBER. FIYAH is looking to pay an artist to design the cover for our inaugural issue! We are a Black speculative fiction magazine publishing quarterly, which means there will be four different submission periods.…

Cover of FIRE!! Magazine (1926)

A History of FIRE

The FIRE!! Then In 1926 Harlem a group of black intellectuals and artists met regularly at the home of the novelist, editor, and critic Wallace Thurman. A native of St. Louis, Thurman had arrived to join the flourishing Harlem Renaissance, and took up a job editing labor leader Asa Phillip Randolph’s newspaper The Messenger. But at night he pursed his…

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